Outreach Program Student Guidelines

Hmmmm….we’ve been assigned this “Outreach” project…..where do we start??

After you’ve determined what your project is and/or who your audience will be, get your group together and follow the steps below!

Step 1 – Know Your Audience!

You have been assigned a target person or group. Your goal is to help this person or group of people meet their goals (i.e., injury prevention on the job, student recruitment, education, etc).

First you need to do a little digging to find out the needs of your audience. Don’t assume anything! Ask a contact person in your audience WELL IN ADVANCE OF YOUR PRESENTATION to tell you what they need from you.

You might call or e-mail them and say “This is _____ from the Lake Superior College PTA Program; we have a class assignment to provide training/services to you on (date) about ______________. We want to make sure we understand the goals you have in mind….for example, can you give me an idea of the physical requirements of your job?” (if this is relevant to your project) If they lift things, find out WHAT they lift and how often. If they work at a computer, find out how long they do so at a time. If they reach, bend, twist, move patients, etc., find out the details. One great way to find out these details is to shadow that person at work for an hour or two. You’ll gain a great deal of insight this way.

This is also the time to confirm the day and time (and length!!)of your presentation. If a date and time was initially scheduled, you should confirm this; it may not actually work out for the day or time originally scheduled; choose a mutually-agreeable day and time and make sure you know where the training will occur (the site should be convenient for your audience – usually in their classroom or workplace). 

**Do not schedule your presentation during regular clinic or class time. 

LET BRENDA MARTIN KNOW THE DAY/TIME OF YOUR PRESENTATION AT LEAST TWO WEEKS IN ADVANCE; she will attend this session or find a replacement to attend and supervise. YOU MAY NOT DO YOUR TRAINING OUTSIDE OF THE DULUTH-SUPERIOR AREA UNLESS APPROVED BY AN INSTRUCTOR (THIS WILL OCCUR ONLY IN EXTREME SITUATIONS).

Step 2 – Decide on Your Focus!

Based on the needs of your audience and the goals for your project, create an outline of what you want/need to include in your project/presentation.

 Step 3 – Design Your Presentation!

You need a clear introduction and purpose/goals, explanation of relevant anatomy (for injury prevention presentations – so your audience understands what parts of their body may be injured if they don’t follow your instructions), demonstration of correct techniques, time for practice, and a clear summary. It should be an INTERACTIVE presentation….under no circumstances should any one in your group stand in front of the audience and read word-for-word the information on the handouts you give to the audience. Anything else you want to add to spice up the presentation is up to you. The presentation should last between 50 and 90 minutes (sometimes this is shorter or longer, and sometimes you do a short presentation which is repeated several times), depending on the needs of your audience. Make sure you are clear how much time is available to you. For a sample outline, click here.

Put it all in writing so you have a plan of action (use the form provided). Brenda Martin needs to see your plan of action at least one week prior to your presentation. 

You may need to look things up in the library or on the internet. For example, there are guidelines for how far a person should sit from their computer, the height of the keyboard, etc. When training anyone who works at a computer, this is vital information! A good keyword when searching the internet is “ergonomics.”

Decide how everyone in your group will participate in the training.

If you have questions or get stuck, send an e-mail message to Jane Worley.

Step 4 – Make Your Presentation

Interesting and Professional!

What audio and/or visual aids will you use to keep your audience awake and interested? If handouts would be helpful (hint…they usually are!), be sure they are professional in appearance (yes, spelling matters!) Will you have credibility as a presenter if you’re dressed in jeans and a t-shirt or if you’re slouching in your chair during the presentation?

PRACTICE your training. Run your ideas by a faculty member.

Not nuts about public speaking? Neither is anyone else in your group. Here are a few links to help… also, remember that the more prepared you are the less nervous you will be…
Public Speaking Tips and Resources

Step 5 – the DRY RUN!!!

Unless otherwise discussed, you must present a satisfactory dry run of your presentation, with your entire group present, to a PTA faculty member prior to your actual presentation. You will be given feedback during this dry run that you should incorporate into your actual presentation. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO SCHEDULE THE DRY RUN WITH A FACULTY MEMBER.

Your dry run must be complete at least one week prior to your actual presentation!

Step 6 – On With The Show! 

A faculty member from the PTA program will accompany you to the training, and can help as needed, but you are in charge; YOU are the teachers for the presentation!

Step 7 – Feedback!

If appropriate, one or more members of your audience may be asked to provide written feedback after the presentation (Presentation Survey). Students will also complete a confidential questionnaire about how the group worked together to complete this project, including the Group Presentation Rating Form (one per student) and the project outcome report form (one per project). The faculty member who observes your training session will also provide feedback to the group. **The three (3) forms must be turned in to faculty within a week of your presentation.**