Accessible D2L Materials

General Information

This guide has tips that you can use to create accessible materials in D2L. If you would like a downloadable or printable copy of the guide, please see the 3 Tips for Creating Accessible D2L Materials handout. If you would like a quick reference sheet when you are working on your own documents, please see the Accessibility Checklist D2L Brightspace Materials.

How to Decide Which is the Best File Format to Use

D2L has several options for the type of files that can be created in or uploaded to the system. How do you know which is the best one? The first thing you need to decide is how are your participants going to interact with the items:

  • Is the information something your participants just need to read?
    • If so, the D2L Create a File option using the HTML Editor would be the best way to do this. The HTML Editor allows you to create and update the materials instantly and doesn’t require additional software to view it. You can copy and paste the text from a Word document into the HTML Editor, so you don’t have to retype everything.
  • Does the information contain something complex that can’t be easily created or copied and pasted into the HTML Editor?
    • If so, uploading an accessible PDF document would be the best way to do this. Most computers and mobile devices can read a PDF, so the participant shouldn’t need additional software to view it.
  • Is the information something your participants must interact with, such as fill out a form or assignment sheet?
    • If so, uploading an accessible Word document would be the best way to do this. Keep in mind that additional software would be needed to view this file format, but LSC students have access to Office 365 which includes the Microsoft Office suite (Word, PowerPoint, Excel, etc.) that can be installed on up to 5 computers or devices.
  • Is the information you want your participants to view in a PowerPoint presentation?
    • If so, and if it the presentation has a small file size, uploading the PowerPoint presentation could be one way to do this. Keep in mind that additional software would be needed to view this file format. Another way would be to save the presentation as an accessible PDF and upload that into your course. Saving a presentation as a PDF creates a smaller file size and makes it difficult to change the information on the slides.
  • Is the information already online somewhere?
    • If so, using the D2L Create a Link option or the Quicklink feature in the HTML Editor would be the best way to do this. Linking to the original resource means that if the website owner updates the information, your course will be updated without additional work on your part. Note: If the website URL is changed or disabled by the owner, that will cause a broken link in your course that you will need to fix. It’s recommended that you regularly check the links in your course to make sure they are still active.
  • Is the information available in an alternative delivery method like a video?
    • If so, you can embed videos from VidGrid, YouTube, Films on Demand, and MediaSpace in Content topics without using a link to send students to the source. If you embed the video in a Create a File topic, you’re able to include instructions to your students, questions they should answer, and other important information about the video or activity.

Please see the other tips for creating accessible PDF documents, Word documents, and PowerPoint presentations guides on the Technology Tools and Knowledge Bites Accessibility page for assistance making the files you upload into D2L accessible.

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Course Structure Best Practices

The best way to structure your course is to be consistent with your expectations, layouts, wording, and deadlines. For each week, you should:

  • Clearly define what is expected of the participants and what they will learn by the end of it.
  • Have a similar layout that includes the week’s learning objectives, readings, activities, etc. Use similar wording for the names, descriptions, and directions throughout the course. Note: The activities for each week can be different but they should be explained in a similar manner, so the participants can quickly see what’s required of them. This is an example of a Content structure using Weekly modules but could be used for chapters, units, etc.:
    • Week 1
      • Week 1 Overview (learning objectives, expectations, etc.)
      • Week 1 Readings (textbook, articles, websites, etc.)
      • Week 1 Discussions (in online courses)
      • Week 1 Assignment (online submissions)
    • Week 2
      • Week 2 Overview (learning objectives, expectations, etc.)
      • Week 2 Readings (textbook, articles, websites, etc.)
      • Week 2 Video Resources (embedded and linked videos)
      • Week 2 Assignment (online submissions)
      • Week 2 Quiz (online assessment)
  • Have consistent deadlines for when Assignments, Discussions, and Quizzes are due. For example, all assignments are due or close by 11:59 PM on the same day each week. Original Discussions posts are due by 11:59 PM on the same day each week and the reply posts are due by 11:59 PM on the same day each week. Quizzes have the same date and time range (a week, a day, etc.) for each as well as the amount of time (30 minutes, 1 hour, etc.) to take it in.

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Use the Accessibility Options in the HTML Editor

The HTML Editor in D2L has several features that make creating accessible topics, articles, and folders easier. In this section, you’ll learn about using accessible fonts and contrasting colors; adding Alternative Text for images and Quicklinks; using built-in features like Lists and Tables; and using the built-in Accessibility Checker.

Select Accessible Fonts and Colors

Examples of a San Serif font like Arial and a Serif Font like Times New Roman with the end strokes of the Serif font circled.

There are several fonts, sizes, and colors to choose from in the D2L HTML Editor. When deciding which of these to use, you’ll want to make sure they are easy to read and to understand. When selecting a font, you should use a San Serif font like Arial, Verdana, or Tahoma. These fonts have a cleaner, modern look without the small features at the end strokes of the letter. It is recommended that a font size no smaller than 12 points be used within the documents. D2L has a system font that is used as the default font, but individual users can change what size the font displays – small, medium, large, and huge – for them in the Account Settings area.

Adding colored text in the HTML Editor is acceptable but it shouldn’t be used as the only emphasis for certain text. For example, color shouldn’t be used to tell someone where information can be found, like “Click on the red dates for availability”. Someone with a visual impairment or is color blind may not be able to tell that color from another one you may have used in the HTML Editor.

Screen shot of the H T M L Editor in D 2 L with an arrow pointing to the Select Color icon and the Select a Color window highlighted

If you change the colors for the text and/or background from the default colors, make sure that they have a high contrast ratio. You can use the built-in WCAG Color Contrast Checker to see if the colors you’ve selected have a high enough contrast to meet the minimum accessibility ratio requirements of 4.5:1. To do this, highlight the text you want to change the color for in the HTML Editor and click Select Color icon to open the Select a Color window. You will see a grid of colors near the top, select the color you would like to use and see if there is enough of a contrast between the text color and the background color. If the colors have enough of a contrast, a green check mark will appear between the sample text and the contrast ratio.

Screen shot highlighting low color contrast results

If there isn’t enough contrast, a red X will appear between the sample text and the contrast ratio.

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Use Heading Tags

Screen shot of the H T M L Editor in D 2 L with an arrow pointing to the Format menu with the Heading options highlighted

Headings tags can be found in the Format menu on the HTML Editor in D2L. The Heading 1 (H1) should be used for the main topic or title of the document. The Heading 2 (H2) should be used for each major section within the web document. The Heading 3 (H3) should be used for subsections within the major sections and so on through the list to Heading 6 (H6) as needed. Each heading should be:

  • Short, concise, and include key points.
  • Unique and the heading name only used once within the web document.
  • Written to give people clues about the information that follows them.

Why is Using Headings Important?

  • Most people skim a document, headings make it easier for the reader to find what they are looking for.
  • Most assistive technologies are programed to find Headings, so people who use them will understand the structure of the document and move throughout it easily.
  • People who have reading and cognitive disabilities depend on headings to organize content into groups of related ideas that provide clues about the information they are reviewing.

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Use Alternative (Alt) Text for Images

Screen shot of the H T M L Editor in D 2 L with an arrow pointing to the Insert Stuff icon and the Add a File window is highlighted

The Alt Text can be added when an image is inserted in to the HTML Editor in D2L. To do this, click on the Insert Image (camera) icon, and, on the Add a File window, select where the image file is located.

Screen shot of the Add a File window with an arrow pointing to clicking the Add button.
After the image has been selected, click the Add button.

Screen shot of the Provide Alternative Text window with the Alternative Text and the This image is decorative check box highlighted.

Type an Alternative Text in text box on the Provide Alternative Text window. If the image is decorative, check the “This image is decorative” box and click the OK button. If an image is marked as decorative, assistive technology will skip it.  Please see the D2L Brightspace Images Alt Text handout for full instructions on how to add images.

Each Alt Text should be short, concise, and describes what’s important about the image. When writing the description, keep in mind:

  • You don’t need to include “image of” or “picture of” in the description, the screen reader software will supply that information to the user.
  • If the image contains text, include that in the alt text description exactly as it appears in the image.
  • If it is a complex image that can’t be described a few words, you may want to include that information in the paragraph text near the image instead of as part of the alt text description.
  • If a diagram or graphic is too complex to describe in a short sentence, finding another way to display the information, such as a data table, would be best.

Why is Using Alt Text for Images Important?

  • Screen readers and text-to-speech tools will read the image alt text information out loud.
  • People who are unable to see the image rely on the alt text to describe what information the image or diagram is supposed to convey to them.
  • If meaningful alt text is not included, a person using a screen reader will only hear that it is an image not what it is a picture of.

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Screen shot of the H T M L editor in D 2 L with arrows pointing to the Quick Links icon, scrolling down the Insert Quick Links menu and selecting the U R L option

Adding alt text for links is done when a Quicklink is inserted in to the HTML Editor in D2L. To do this, click the Insert Quicklink (chain) icon, scroll to the bottom of the list, and select the Url option.

Screen shot of the Insert Quick Link window showing where to add a Title and an arrow pointing to the Target New Window option

A new screen will appear that allows you to type or copy and paste the website’s URL and add a meaningful Title that will be the alt text for this link. Note: Please avoid phrases like “click here” or “more information”, because by themselves they don’t provide enough information for someone using a screen reader. If you need help finding something meaningful, visit the website you are linking to for the name and use that as part of the title.

Since this link will be going to an outside website, select the Target “New Window” option. This will allow participants to keep their D2L course open on one tab and go to the link destination in another. When they close the linked website, they’ll still have D2L open. Note: If you use the New Window option, make sure to include “(opens new window)” as part of the link name.  For example, a link could be “Accessibility website (opens new window)”

Why is Using Alt Text for Quicklinks Important?

  • All viewers benefit from alt text for Quicklinks because it provides the destination and purpose of the link.
  • Screen reading software can pull up all the links on a page to help the person using it navigate the page quickly.
  • Screen readers and text-to-speech tools will read the alt text information instead of reading the URL one character at a time or trying to pronounce the letters as words. Hear what a Hyperlink Screen Reader example (video) sounds like to someone using a screen reader if the URL is used instead of an alternative text.

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Create Lists Using the Built-in Feature

Screen shot of the H T M L Editor in D 2 L highlighting where the Bulleted Lists icon is located. The Bulleted Lists and Numbered Lists options on the menu are highlighted

The Bulleted List icon can be found on the main menu of the D2L HTML Editor. The Numbered List icon is in the dropdown menu to the right of the Bulleted List icon. Use a Bulleted List when it’s a group of related items or use a Numbered List when the sequence of the items is important. When you create lists, make sure to include a phrase or sentence just before it to describe the purpose of the list so people using screen readers will know what type of information is coming next.

Why is Using Built-in Lists Important?

  • People who use screen readers will be notified when a list is used so they’ll know what comes next is a part of a group of ideas or information.
  • Screen readers and text-to-speech tools are programmed to understand if it’s a numbered or bulleted list and convey that to the user.
  • If the built-in List styles aren’t used and you type the information manually like putting a number, a period, a couple of spaces, and then the information, the screen reader software will read each character separately.

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Create Simple Data Tables Using the Built-in Feature

Screen shot of the H T M L Editor in D 2 L with an arrow pointing to the Table drop down menu with other Table properties options highlighted

The Insert Table icon can be found on the main menu of the D2L HTML Editor. The dropdown menu to the right of the Insert Table icon has related table options, like Table and Cell properties; add or remove rows; and add or remove columns. After a table has been added, some of the table properties menu options will appear under it.

Screen shot of an inserted table with Table Properties and other options highlighted

There are a few things that need to be done after a table has been created to make it accessible.

Screen shot of the Table Properties window with an arrow pointing to selecting the Show caption check box

The first is to add a Caption, this is like adding alternative text to an image or Quicklink. To do this, select the Table Properties icon (first icon), select the Show caption checkbox and click the Save button.

Screen shot of the H T M L Editor in D 2 L highlighting adding a caption to the table

An area will appear above the table, type a caption that is short, concise, and describes what’s important about the table.

Screen shot of the H T M L Editor in D 2 L with arrows pointing to selecting the header row in the table then selecting the Table drop down menu, and Cell Properties.

The second thing is to add a Header Row that describes each columns’ contents. In D2L, you will need to manually mark the header row, so screen reader software will recognize it. To do this, hold the Shift key on your keyboard, select the first row of the table, select the Tables dropdown menu, then select Cell and finally select the Cell Properties item from the list.

Screen shot of the Cell Properties window with arrows pointing to the Cell Type drop down menu and selecting the Header cell option

On the Cell Properties window, you’ll need to select the Cell Type dropdown menu, select Header cell, and click the Save button. If the table’s first column describes the rows’ contents as well, make sure that you manually mark the header column. To do this, select the first column and repeat the steps above until you are on the Cell Properties window, then select Column Header from the Cell Type dropdown menu, and click the Update button.

The third thing to do is to use the Tab key on your keyboard to move through the table to make sure the tab order of the cells matches how they appear in the table.

Please avoid using tables, nested tables, merged cells, split cells, or blank cells for layout and formatting purposes.

Why is Using the Built-in Data Tables Important?

  • People who use screen readers will be notified when a table is used so they’ll know what is read next is part of a data group.
  • Adding a Header Row and/or Column will help someone who uses a screen reader to understand how the information is laid out and allow for easier navigation within the table.
  • Some screen reading software can repeat the header row and column labels on request or before the cell data is given.

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Use the Built-in Accessibility Checker

Screen shot of the H T M L Editor in D 2 L with arrows pointing to the Accessibility Checker icon in the second row of icons at the top and highlighting an open Accessibility Checker window

The Check Accessibility (eye with a checkmark) icon can be found in the HTML Editor tool bar. Use the Check Accessibility feature to find and fix any accessibility issues within the HTML document. The Accessibility Checker results will open a new window that will show:

  • The issues the checker found.
  • The recommended action to fix the issue.
  • Buttons to Repair Issue or Ignore the issue.
  • Buttons to go to the Previous Issue or the Next Issue.

Why is Using the Accessibility Check Important?

  • You will know that everyone who reviews your web documents will be able to get the most out of the information you are supplying.
  • If you are new to making your web documents accessible, the Accessibility Checker will help you fix any problems you might not know are there.
  • Using the Accessibility Check option is an easy way to make sure all the information you put in D2L meets the accessibility standards.

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Include Multimedia that is Accessible

There are several ways to make the multimedia (audio and video clips) accessible in your course:

  • Create a transcript of the audio and video clips.
  • Use a program or service that captions the clip using specialty software.
    • Mechanical or automatic captioning is usually 70% – 90% accurate and the results need some editing as well as capitalization and punctuation added.
    • When creating your own multimedia clips, if you speak clearly and at a slightly slower pace, the mechanical captioning should have a higher accuracy rate.
  • Use a paid program or service that uses mechanical captioning and then human reviewing of the results for the clip.
    • Most paid services charge per minute of the video length, so the longer the video the more the captioning will cost. The campus has a 10-minute video length limit for videos that will be captioned in VidGrid. Note: Anything longer that will need an IT Help Desk ticket accompanying it.
  • Create an audio description for video clips.
    • Audio descriptions are different from transcripts and captions, they provide information about what is visually happening in the video not just the dialog or music for people with visual disabilities.
  • Use resources like Films on Demand that already have closed captioning available for their video clips.

See WebAIM Captions, Transcripts, and Audio Descriptions for more information on the different ways to make multimedia accessible.

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VidGrid

Screen shot of the Vid Grid with an arrow pointing to the C C (close caption) icon and the Captioning request screen highlighted

VidGrid has two built-in options for captioning, free mechanical captioning and paid professional (human) captioning. In most cases, the mechanical captioning will fit your needs, you’ll just want to check the captions for accuracy afterwards. This is something you should do for the captions on any video you add to your D2L Brightspace courses to make sure the information is correct.

If there are captioning credits available in VidGrid and your video(s) meet the recommendations, you can use professional (human) captioning. You can use the Multimedia Captioning Decision Tree to determine which is the best option for you.

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Kaltura My Media

Screen shot of the Kaltura Media Space video with arrows pointing to the Actions and selecting the Order Captions option. The Mechanical Captions Order Request area is highlighted.

Kaltura My Media has a built-in mechanical captioning feature that has a 70 to 80% accuracy rate. After uploading a video you’ve created to the Minnesota State My Media area, you can select the Actions dropdown menu and select the Caption & Enrich option. If this is a Zoom meeting recording, the machine captions will be sent over from Zoom and you’ll just need to edit them as needed.

Screen shot of the Kaltura Media Space video with arrows pointing to the Captions tab and the Upload captions file button. The message saying no captions have been added to media is highlighted

On the Captioning screen, select the Mechanical captioning and click the Order Captions button. If you already have a captioning file (SRT or DFXP formats) for the video, you can edit the video, select the Captions tab, and click the Upload captions file button.

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Films on Demand

Screen shot of a Films on Demand video with the captions turned on and the C C (close caption) icon highlighted.

Most Films on Demand titles have Closed Captioning automatically available; newer videos may take a few weeks before the captions are available. Viewers can turn on the captioning by clicking on the CC icon in the lower right corner of the player.

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YouTube

YouTube Closed Captioning is automatic but uses mechanical captioning. This allows more people to have accessible videos, but also requires reviewing and editing of the captions that the video creator may not have done. Viewers can turn on the captioning by clicking on the CC icon in the lower right corner of the player.

Why is Include Multimedia that is Accessible Important?

  • By having your videos captioned and audio transcripts available to participants, people with disabilities be able to understand the multimedia used in the course.
  • Having the captions and transcripts also helps people who may not be able to play the audio because they are in quiet areas like computer labs and libraries or places with loud background noise.
  • Having the captions may also help people learn English or complex topics easier because the words are on the screen as they are being said.

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Adding Accessible Multimedia from Outside Resources

Adding audio and video clips from outside sources like Kaltura My Media, Films on Demand, YouTube, VidGrid, etc. can be done two ways in D2L Brightspace.

Screen shot of the H T M L Editor in D 2 L Bright space with an arrow pointing to the Insert Stuff icon and the Insert Stuff video embed menu highlighted

The first way is through the HTML Editor anywhere it’s used in the course – Announcements, Assignments, Content, Discussions, Quizzes, etc. To do this:

  1. Open the HTML Editor.
  2. Click on the Insert Stuff (player) icon
  3. Scroll to the bottom of the list, and select the video location (Kaltura My Media, YouTube, Films on Demand, VidGrid) or, if it isn’t listed, Enter Embed Code option.

Screenshots of the Insert Stuff windows for Films on Demand, You Tube, Vid Grid, and the Enter Embed Code with the search options, video select, and embed code areas highlighted in each one

Depending on which source you selected, the next screen may have a search box to find the video you’re looking for (YouTube, Films on Demand, etc.), the videos and audio clips in your account (VidGrid), or a text box to enter the embed code for the video.

Note: Using the HTML Editor allows you to provide more information about the video or the assignment to the participants, but may limit your completion tracking abilities if you have multiple videos embedded there.

Screenshot of a module in the Content area in D 2 L Bright Space with arrows pointing to the Upload / Create menu and the video or audio selected. The Video or Audio window is open, showing where to paste the embed code.

The second way can only be done in the Content area by creating a Video or Audio topic. To do this:

  1. Select the Module you would like the video or audio topic in.
  2. Select the Upload / Create dropdown menu.
  3. Select the Video or Audio item. The Add Video or Audio window will open, and you will be able to paste the embed code from an outside resource in the text area. You can paste embed codes from VidGrid, Kaltura My Media, Films on Demand, YouTube, etc.

Note: Using the Video or Audio topic allows the Content Completion Tracking option to be used to see if the participants have accessed the video, but you’ll only be able to provide a title and topic description to the participants not any video or assignment details.

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Give Additional Time Using Special Access

If you have participants who need additional time or a different date range to complete their work in, you can use the Special Access features in the Assignments and Quizzes areas to give them the additional access. If you have participants who only need additional time for all of your quizzes, you can use the Accommodations feature.

Add Special Access to an Individual Assignment

To give Assignments Special Access to a participant:

Edit the Assignment folder you want to give the Special Access to.

Screenshot of the Edit Assignment screen with arrows pointing to selecting the Availability Dates & Conditions expand arrow and selecting the Manage Special Access link

  1. Expand the Availability Dates & Conditions menu in the upper right side of the assignment screen.
  2. Select the Manage Special Access link.

Screenshot of the Manage Special Access screen with an arrow pointing to clicking the Add Users to Special Access button. The Allow users with special access options are highlighted

Click the Add Users to Special Access button.

Note: Just above the Add Users to Special Access button, is the “Allow users with special access to submit outside the normal availability dates for this folder” radio button that should remain selected. This will allow both the student(s) with special access and those with regular access to be able to see the folder and submit their work to it. The “Allow only users with special access to see this folder” option will only allow the student(s) with special access to see the folder and submit their work to it, no one else.

Screenshot of the Assignments Special Access screen with date availability options highlighted. Arrows pointing to the selecting students and the Save button.

The Special Access screen will appear and allow you to set up the additional dates and times that this folder will be available for those who need it. After setting up the dates and times, select the student(s) who should have this access and click the Save button.

Screenshot highlighting special Access recipients with new dates and times, how to edit or remove them, and an arrow pointing to clicking the Save and Close button

Once Special Access has been given, the person’s name will appear under the Add Users to Special Access button on the Special Access window along with the details for the access. If you need to edit the special access, use the pencil icon to the right of the date information. If you need to delete the special access, use the “X” to the right of the date information.

Click the Save and Close button to return to the assignment editing screen.

The Availability Dates & Conditions section will show a new section called “Users can submit outside normal availability dates” and have the number of users listed who have the special access.

Click the Save and Close button to finish giving Special Access to an assignment folder.

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Give a Student Accommodations for all Quizzes in Your Course

If you have several quizzes in your course and want to give a student with a documented disability extended time or right click access, you’re able to do this through the Accommodations feature in the Classlist.
Screenshot of the Edit Accommodations window with the information from A through C highlighted

  1. Select the dropdown menu to the right of the student’s name.
  2. Select the Edit Accommodations option.

Screenshot of the Edit Accommodations window with the information from A through C highlighted

  1. Multiplier of original quiz time – this will give an additional amount of time based on the original quiz time and the multiplier amount. For example, if the first quiz’s original time was 30 minutes and you had 1.5 times as the multiplier, the student would get 45 minutes to complete the quiz in. If the second quiz’s original time was 60 minutes with the multiplier of 1.5 times, the student would get 90 minutes to complete it in.
  2. Extra Time – this will add the same amount of time to all quizzes, no matter what the original quiz time was. For example, if the first quiz’s original time was 25 minutes and you gave the student 10 extra minutes, they would have 35 minutes to complete the quiz in. If the second quiz’s original time was 45 minutes with the 10 minutes extra, the student would have 55 minutes to complete the quiz in.
  3. Always Allow Right Clicks – this will allow the student to use the right click options during a quiz. Their assistive technology might need this allowed.

Screenshot of the Classlist with the Accommodation's icon to the right of the student's name

Once you’ve clicked the Save button, you’ll be taken back to the Classlist where you should see the Accommodations icon to the right of their name. You can use the Edit Accommodations option to adjust the settings as needed.

Add Special Access to an Individual Quiz

To give Quiz Special Access to a participant:

Edit the quiz you want to give Special Access to.

Note: If a student with accommodations for all quizzes through the Classlist is given Special Access for an individual quiz, the Special Access settings will be what D2L Brightspace uses, not the accommodations originally given.

Screenshot of the Edit Quiz screen with arrows pointing to selecting the Availability Dates & Conditions expand arrow and selecting the Manage Special Access link

  1. Expand the Availability Dates & Conditions menu in the upper right side of the assignment screen.
  2. Select the Manage Special Access link.

Screenshot of the Manage Special Access screen with an arrow pointing to clicking the Add Users to Special Access button. The Allow users with special access options are highlighted

Click the Add Users to Special Access button.

Note: Like in the Assignments area, just above the Add Users to Special Access button, is the “Allow selected users special access to this quiz” radio button that should remain selected to allow the student(s) with special access and the rest of the students to access the quiz. The “Allow only users with special access to see this quiz” option will only allow the student(s) with special access to take the quiz, no one else.

The Add Special Access to Quiz screen will appear, you can:

Screen shot of the Quizzes Special Access screen with the different areas mentioned in A through E highlighted

  1. Change the Due, Start, End dates and times.
  2. Change the amount of time allowed. Note: To setup the time restrictions, you’ll need to select either the Recommended Time Limit or the Enforced time limit radio buttons.
  3. Change the number of attempts by checking the Override attempts allowed. After changing the number of attempts, click the Apply button. Once you do this, other options will appear. Note: Remember to add the additional quiz attempt to the number listed. For example, if the students already have 2 attempts and you want to give an additional one, change the number to 3 attempts.
  4. Select the student(s) who should have this additional access. Note: You’re able to give several students the same access at once, but if they needed different dates, times, or attempts, you’d have to create individual special access options for them.
  5. Click the Save button to save your changes.

If you change the Timing by selecting the Enforced Time Limit radio button, you can:

Screenshot of the Enforced Time Limit section with the different options mentioned in A through E highlighted

Note: The original time for the quiz will be listed just below the above the New Time Limit text box. The options for the New Time Limit, Multiplier of original quiz time, and Extra Time are connected; if you update one of these options, the other two will automatically adjust to match it.

  1. New Time Limit text box where you can give a new quiz time in minutes. Note: If you’d rather use a multiplier or extra time options, the amount of time for the new quiz will be automatically updated here.
  2. Multiplier of original quiz time where this will give an additional amount of time based on the original quiz time and the multiplier amount like how the Accommodations feature works. Note: If you’d rather type in a new quiz time or give extra time, the multiplier for those adjustments will be automatically updated here.
  3. Extra Time text box where you can give a specific number of additional minutes. Note: If you’d rather type the new quiz time or use the multiplier, the extra time for those adjustments will be automatically updated here.
  4. Check the Assign an alternative grace period if you’d like to make an adjustment to the original grace period.
  5. Check the Assign an alternative behavior for exceeding the time limit if you’d like to make an adjustment to the original exceeded time limit behavior.

Screenshot highlighting the quiz special Access recipients with new dates and times, how to edit or remove them, and an arrow pointing to clicking the Save and Close button

Once Special Access has been given, the person’s name will appear under the Add Users to Special Access button on the Special Access window along with the details for the access. If you need to edit the special access, use the pencil icon to the right of the date information. If you need to delete the special access, use the “X” to the right of the date information.

Click the Save and Close button to return to the quiz editing screen.

Screenshot of the Edit Quiz screen with the Special Access that's been given highlighted and an arrow pointing to clicking the Save and Close button

The Availability Dates & Conditions section will show a new section called “Users can submit outside normal availability dates” and have the number of users listed who have the special access.

Click the Save and Close button to finish giving Special Access to the quiz.

Why is Giving Additional Time Using Special Access Important?

  • People with learning disabilities may need additional time to complete their work and Special Access will give that to them without changing it for any of the other students’ access.
  • Special Access also allows students who are going to be away when an assignment or quiz is due to be able to complete their work before or after they return to campus.
  • If you have a student who needs an additional quiz attempt without removing their existing attempt(s), you can use Special Access to do this.

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Additional Information and Resources

This was created using tips from the WebAIM website and the Lake Superior College ROAD to Accessibility course. If you are interested in taking the ROAD course, please contact your direct supervisor to ask about taking it as a staff development activity.

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